Monthly Archives: October 2014

Ogre Slaughtermaster with Spellbook conversion

Here are final shots of a recent commission for a Warhammer Ogre Kingdoms Slaughtermaster with a gnoblar converted to hold a spellbook. It was a fairly simple conversion once I found a gnoblar with a mostly flat back. I just had to make the wooden stand and straps and find a suitable book. The book is from a Space Marines vehicle kit.

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

GW Ogre Slaughtermaster conversion Standard + with Level 1 basing

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WIP Ogre Slaughtermaster

I’m in the middle of a pretty cool commission right now. It’s an Ogre Slaughtermaster with a gnoblar converted to hold a spellbook/ogre cookbook.

Here are some WIP shots:

book wip

 

ogre front wip ogre back wip gnoblar front wip gnoblar back wip

Choosing a Commission Painter

It seems like I’m hearing stories more and more often from people who paid a person or a business to paint their models and were extremely unhappy with the results, and it’s really disheartening to me personally. I work with my clients in mind. My goal is for them to be happy with what they get. I’m far from the only one like that, but there seem to be a growing number of people/businesses that don’t seem to care. Here are a few tips to help make sure you don’t end up unhappy with what you get:

1. Don’t choose a painter just because a lot of people have heard of them. This does not mean they are good (or bad), or that you will be happy, it just means they have put a lot of effort into getting their name out there.

2. Look through their body of work, not just one or two small projects. You need to make sure their style and level of quality is in line with what you want. This will also help make sure your expectations of the painter are realistic.

3. Discuss all the details with the painter. If you have very specific ideas about the model, the painter needs to know this. Also, even if you want them to just do what they think is best, ASK them what their plan is and make sure it’s something you can be happy with.

4.┬áRemember that, just like with so many other things in life, typically you will get what you pay for. If the painting is cheap, it’s likely also very low quality. Good painting is rarely cheap. You are paying for the time and expertise of the painter, not just the paint they apply to the models. Just like anyone else, they must make a living wage!

5. Make your communication needs known, and, if necessary, make them part of the contract. If you want updates every 3 days irregardless of how much progress has been made, say so! Also, if the painter has poor communication when you are trying to information and a quote from them, that is unlikely to change when you hire them.

6. Make sure you are fully aware of what the level of painting you are purchasing will get you. If you choose an award winning painter, but ask them to do tabletop, don’t expect the┬átabletop models to look like competition models.

7. Make sure you understand the turn-around time. If they quote you 3 weeks, make sure you know 3 weeks from when. For instance, my turnaround times start from when I have the model(s) in hand, not necessarily when the deposit is made.

 

Commission scheduling and For Sale updates

My commission schedule for the holiday season is starting to fill up, so if you’ve been thinking about a project now is the time to claim your spot in my queue!

Also, I have a lot of models sitting around that I need to post on my For Sale page, so I’ll be doing that soon.

I’m starting a new commission today, so there will be WIP pics soon!